Snapchat Spectacles : Do They Have a Future?

To be honest, I thought the Snapchat spectacles were a waste of money when I first heard about them. “Oh great, another company trying to make glasses with a gimmick”. So I put them out of my mind and moved on despite hearing about all the craze in Los Angeles and New York regarding their pop-up Spectacle vending machines.

snapchat-spectacles

Fast forward to this past weekend. I was on a trip with a group of friends and a couple of them brought their Spectacles along. Every now and then they would press the button on the side of the glasses to start recording a 10 second video. Although they used it quite regularly, I almost never noticed them filming except for in darker areas where the ring of light around the camera would animate while it was recording. At this moment I had revised my opinion of them to “They’re great “spy-like” glasses for recording video”.

The true “aha” moment came at the end of each day when my friends would view the footage and transfer it to their phones. As we watched each clip I felt that I was seeing each moment through their eyes, not just some video they had recorded. It turns out that the 115 degree angle lens being placed on a pair of glasses right next to your eyes is a great POV (Point of View) recording combo. This led to the next realization, “Why bother taking out a camera/phone, or strapping a GoPro to your head to record?” Just throw on a pair of Spectacles and press the button to record while still living in the moment. There’s no need to check a screen to make sure you’ve got the shot, or fumble with opening up an app or sending it right then an there. The key to the future of the Spectacles (in my opinion) is that it allows you to live in the moment, record the moment, and relive the moment.

However, there are a couple of improvements that I think would greatly increase its adoption for “capturing the moment”.

  1. Waterproof it (allows you to take it to more areas)
  2. Hide the camera better or make it smaller (allows you to put it into other styles)
  3. Make the lenses swappable so that you can have clear ones for night-time or indoors but shades for the day (allows you to wear it in more areas)
  4. Make the battery last longer (always on the list for any electronic)
  5. Make the video capture capabilities longer (having options is always better and being able to select the default length of clips would be nice. Press the button again in the middle of recording to stop it earlier)

Will I buy one now? Maybe. But I’ll be looking out for the V2 for sure.

 

 

Youtube Video Efforts & LED Mask

Lately I’ve focused more of my efforts on Youtube videos for the side projects that I build. While I enjoy the process of writing blog entries, I also found that I enjoy the visual draw and documentation capabilities that Youtube allows me for the generation process of my side projects. Through the provided analytics I’ve been able to see that the videos I make generate higher engagement, but the value of written posts in providing engagement for text and programming related questions and solutions is undeniable.

The latest video I’ve posted to my Youtube channel is about the making of an LED mask. I have thought about the project in the past and this October I decided to build one using a Particle Photon as the controller. Due to the spacing of the Neopixel LEDs on the strip (60 LEDs per meter) I decided to interlace the strips with an offset.

For those that don’t know, Particle was previously called Spark and I had used their first product, the Core, in the past before the Photon was released. The Photon is evolution of the Core. While much of the platform has stayed the same (both the good and the “could improv), it remains one of my favorite hardware development boards due to its size and capabilities. I’m looking forward to the upcoming release of the Electron that I backed on Kickstarter.

If you want the code for the LED mask, you can find it here.

My Electric Longboard Build – BOM

While I was creating my first build and began to put my first working prototype together, I figured I would document my parts, their prices, and explain why I chose them. I’ve split up the BOM into two parts, the electric longboard components and the board components which are usable on their own for a normal longboard. I decided to go with a single motor design for my first build (it seems fairly trivial to add a second motor in the future) and so far it’s been handling pretty well on hills. The only downside is that sometimes if I lean all the way to the left, the right back wheel comes off the ground slightly and I lose the driving traction. For more info about the trade-offs, check out my previous post.

The way a typical electric longboard works is, you (the rider) use the transmitter to speed up or slow down. The transmitter interacts with a receiver that is hooked up to the ESC (Electronic Speed Controller) which interprets the signal and turns it into a motor signal. The ESC needs to be hooked up to the battery for power since the ESC is what drives the motor. The motor then turns a gear which is hooked up to a belt that will then turn another gear that is attached to your wheel. This is how your longboard will gain movement.

ElectricLongboardDiagram

 

Electric Longboard Components
$70 – 5065 170kV sensored brushless DIYElectricSkateboard motor with 8mm wide and 35mm long shaft
5065 designates the size of the motor and is a common size for electric longboards although they typically have a smaller shaft. 170kV designates the torque the motor can produce (the smaller the number the higher the torque, but the lesser it’s top speed).
motor
$25 – Wiiceiver – (Not needed if you are using the VESC)
 A way to control the input to the ESC coming from the wii nunchuck
wiiceiver
 Has a better feel and is less bulky than a traditional RC controller.wii-controller
$110 + $20 – VESC
I found someone with experience making them and bought one but it needed to be custome made and shipped to me. The extra $20 is because I had to solder on wires and 2200uf 63V capacitor myself.
PCB_Front-1024x683
I used this in the interim while I was waiting from my VESC to be made and shipped to me. With some configuration it turned out to work decently well. I was able to ride it on flat or a slight incline, but with less power and it would cut off if the motor started to draw too much power. 
mambamaxpro
They were a lot cheaper than the 6S1P 5000mah batteries and have decent power and capacity.
5S1PBatteries
DIYElectricSkateboard sells an aluminum part for the motor pulley and I figured that since it’s the part coming off the motor shaft and is only connected by two set screws, it makes sense to get this part made of aluminum to handle the stress.
FREE – 15mm width 36 tooth wheel pulley (3D-printed it myself)
Originally based off a 9mm pulley model, I had to add bigger holes for stronger screws and a couple other changes. I will link to the design I put together for this part once I’ve tested it and made it fit reliably.
OrangatangPulley
$10 – 8mm width 280mm length HTD5 belt
15mm width is better than the 8mm width belt due to it’s wider area and less likelihood of snapping, but an 8mm belt allows for some leeway in alignment.
$5 – 5x M5 x 70mm bolts + washers + nyloc nuts for the wheel mount
These come in a lot more usually than only 5, but it doesn’t hurt to have more just in case.
This works out well and is made of aluminum. This can be replaced with a cheaper non-adjustable mount, but I didn’t like the idea of welding on a mount to my longboard trucks and had not ability to do the welding.
MotorMount
Subtotal: $400

Board Components
I chose these due to the holes in the hub of the wheels that could hold screws in order to mount a gear through.
orangatang_kegel
Due to my choice of wheels, these had to be altered in order to fit them (I used a file to make a bit of room for the screws that hold the gear onto the wheel) If I were to do this again, I might try the Paris trucks since they are more symmetrical.
caliber2fifty
These are some of the better bearings and ride really smoothly.
bonesredsbearings
$100 – Board of your choice
Subtotal: $224

Total $510 with new wheels and trucks on an old longboard
Total $624 from scratch