Creating the Smart Home Universal Remote

It’s been a while since I last made a smart home device, not because my home is fully automated or because there wasn’t a need for another device, but because I still live in a rented unit and didn’t want to to spend the time making and setting up custom devices that would need to be torn down in the future.

Well the other day I realized that I could build another home automation device without a long-term stationary placement requirement! Not too long ago I built voice integration into my smart home system using the Amazon Echo (check out the articles here). While this worked well for moments without ambient noise, it failed to work well during parties, while watching movies, or while listening to music on my sound system. Obviously I needed another way to interact with these smart home devices and the current method of pulling out a phone or tablet, unlocking it, then switching between apps just didn’t appeal to me. What I really wanted was a universal remote that could also talk to my smart home devices.

So I started designing and planning out the features that I would want in my smart home controller and it had to be wireless charged (because replacing batteries or being tethered to a wall is archaic). Here’s the requirements I came up with:

Essentially, the goal is to get it all placed inside of an enclosure like this:

universal-button

Here’s a video of the very early prototype’s functionality:

As well as a more in depth Hackster post:

https://www.hackster.io/anthony-ngu/universal-smart-home-remote-wirelessly-powered-896f3c

Open Smart Hub

Ever since February 22 when I entered the Hackster Hardware Weekend in Seattle, I’ve had a growing passion for the open source side of home automation. What started as a simple idea to automate the closing and opening of windows became something bigger than I ever imagined.

The Hackster.io Hardware Weekend was how the Open Smart Hub was born. I started with a hacked together hub that could run on the Intel Edison and automate a servo to act as the window opening mechanism based on WeatherUnderground API information or light/motion from a Spark.io Core (now named Particle.io). Once the event finished I realized that my implementation couldn’t scale and was horribly confusing to recreate.

I began to research the implementations that were available to the public. What were the open source options? What were the professional products? How did they succeed or fail to solve the problem? My conclusion was that the home automation space was cluttered with all the different companies, organizations, products, and applications. What we as consumers and I as a programmer needed was a simple platform to expand, integrate, and customize my personalized home automation experience. IFTTT is a great alternative but it is impossible to add your own devices, actions, functions, etc. There is no communal collaboration! If you added a device and someone else wanted to use the same sort of device, they would have to recreate it themselves.

That is when I began to reimplement the Open Smart Hub with a modular design. I chose Node.js as my platform because of it’s low barrier to entry for programmers, abundant tutorials, and abundant library of open source modules. The core of the new implementation is the configuration file that declares the available device types (think WeMo switches, Hue light bulbs, Nest, Weather Underground data, etc.) as well as a user’s stored scenarios and devices. I chose an implementation where you could fully own and have the ability to control everything. After all it’s your home!

The implementation is split into two parts, a local hub run on a Raspberry Pi 2 within your home network which handles all the interaction between your devices and an online hub that gives you an accessible UI from anywhere.

Here’s a demo of a basic scenario implementation:

If you would like to check out the details or learn more check out the Hackster.io project: http://www.hackster.io/anthony-ngu/open-source-home-hub