Buy vs. Build a 3D Printer

I have been spending part of my spare time working slowly to get my Prusa i3 built and I am just now finishing the build. I’ve run into multiple problems throughout the experience and thought I would let you in on some of the frustrations. Here are some of those issues to keep in mind:

  • Sourcing all of the metric vs. inches components. Make sure that if you pick one, you stick with it for all the parts or be prepared to figure out which parts will require updates to the .scad files since they will need to be altered to fit your custom components. (Hint: metric is easier for following instructions but harder to source in the US)
  • While your dimensions may be right in the scad file, once printed, they may not match exactly to your specifications and may need to be reprinted.
  • There are many different models for each 3D printed part based on individual scenarios. If you are following instructions for a build, try to use their parts/print designs.
  • There are plenty of options for every component from the the hot-end to the extruder, bolts, rails, etc. and this makes sourcing the right 3D printed parts with the right bolts, nuts, etc. a lot more cumbersome than I initially expected.

Final Thoughts:

If you want to get the experience of building a 3D printer on your own or getting a cheaper 3D printer, the best solution is to buy a kit and then build it. You can alter most designs later to suit your desires. Since most kits for a Prusa i3 use the same Arduino Mega and RAMPS board setup, the software to control add-ons is pretty simple to change.

Now that I have gone through the process of sourcing and building my own, I wish I had just bought a kit and assembled all of those parts myself in order to save myself time, money, and frustration.