Amazon Echo Has Promise for the Future

I got an invite to buy an Amazon Echo a while ago, but didn’t want to purchase one because it didn’t seem particularly useful. It’s only advantage to me was the SDK for speech that might be of use in the future.

After seeing the initial intro video and how scripted the commands had to be, I couldn’t justify the purchase.

If I wanted to get answers to questions I have, I would just pull out my phone and type it out rather than dealing with Speech-To-Text inadequacies when asking a long question. If I wanted to add something to a list, I would write it down on my notes or use my phone for the same reason.

I could play music using a voice command, but to be limited to my Amazon Music Library, Prime Music, or Pandora? No thanks, my audio receiver will do a better job with the audio quality in my home anyways.

On top of that, waiting for a delivery date a couple months later? No thanks.

The Turning Point

That was it, I forgot all about the product until recently. That was when I saw a couple Youtube videos showcasing hacks of the system to configure voice commands for other things! Now this is where it really gains some useful functionality.

Imagine using the mic array and speaker in the Echo to pick up your voice commands and give you audio feedback to commands you create yourself. As a developer, this would have unlimited possibilities in the home! My heart skipped a beat once I saw someone using it for these purposes despite the lack of an official SDK and I immediately started imagining the improvements I could make to my current projects in the home automation space and quickly came up with a couple scenarios that I “need” it for.

There are the typical scenarios like turning on or off appliances and lights in your home, but then there are bigger home automation scenarios where you would communicate with the Echo like you would a personal assistant.

Imagine waking up in the morning and talking to Echo and having it relay specific things you care about like the weather, news, calendar updates, family updates, etc. while also having it turn on the shower so it’s running at your preferred temperature by the time you jump in. Have it make your coffee so that when you get out of the shower, it’s ready. No need to preset things the day before, or stick to a generic schedule. It’s all voice activated.

Now imagine coming home from a day at work and asking it to turn on a specific “mood” for your home, like “summer breeze” that would open your blinds, open your windows, put on some light music, turn on just the right amount of lighting, etc. Have your home work for you!

It looks like Amazon is starting to see the value of this use case with the Echo too, because they recently announced an update that would allow their default voice commands to work with WeMo switches and Hue lights, but those are just basic scenarios.

After all my excitement about being able to create custom commands, I decided to purchase one (despite the couple months I’ll have to wait to finally receive it).

Still a Couple Faults

  • Works well for one room or an open-concept home, but you’ll need separate ones for each room if you want it to work everywhere. (Or maybe an extension of it in other rooms?)
  • From the demos online where people use it, it looks like their speech recognition system isn’t up to par with most of the other speech recognition system, yet.

Enabling Node.js WebSockets on Azure Web App

Recently I found myself confused by a websocket issue on an Azure deployment of a Node.js Socket.io app. In order to run WebSockets on an Azure WebApp or Website, you need to turn off IIS WebSockets module which conflicts with the Node.js WebSockets.

To do this, you have to turn on WebSockets in the configure of the app and do one of two things:

Option 1:

Create the following web.config file in your root folder prior to pushing to the Azure website:

Option 2:

FTP into your website’s location using the URL found in the Azure Management Portal and replace the web.config file in \site\wwwroot location with the content above.

Source:

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/web-sites-nodejs-chat-app-socketio/